Study “Digital Living” at Aarhus University Fall 2014

Study “Digital Living” at Aarhus University Fall 2014

Interested in social and mobile media? Do you care about how technologies impact social and work life? International MA or MS: Digital Living Aarhus University Application deadline: March 15 (April 1 for Danish residents) Notification of Acceptance: early May 2014 Start Date:  1 September 2014 This MA focuses on how digital technologies are used in everyday life and offers students the opportunity to consider how we might design better futures by exploring the intersection of networked sociality, organizational practices, and IT design. Discuss cutting edge knowledge about the social impact of digital technologies with internationally established professors (including yours truly). Learn from computer scientists how digital forms of communication and interaction...

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Metaphors of Internet: Tool, Place, Way of Being (the 2003 version)

This is an unpublished article I wrote in 2003. I am currently revising it to update it, but actually, I have realized that the baseline concepts and overall framework are still quite useful.  I’d be interested in how others might apply this framework to think about how people frame their experiences with digital technologies and media.  For example, my colleague Anja Nylund Hagen at University of Oslo is using (and adapting) this framework in some interesting ways. Anyway, here’s a link to the unpublished (but paginated) print version of the paper here.  It should be cited as an unpublished manuscript or a conference paper. Markham, A. 2003. Metaphors reflecting and shaping the reality of the Internet: Tool, place, way of being. Paper presented...

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“Undermining Data”: My favorite article title to date

So check out my article in the October 2013 issue of First Monday.  In this article, I take issue with our overuse of the term ‘data’ both in everyday life and in scientific research institutions. I look at the rhetorical power  of the term, emphasizing how the idea of ‘data’ frames the way we see and make sense of the world around us.  It’s mostly written for researchers and is meant to contribute in a small way to ongoing critical conversations about big data and the rise of computational thinking. Undermining data: A critical analysis of a core term in scientific inquiry Abstract: The term ‘data’ functions as a powerful frame for discourse about how knowledge is derived and privileges certain ways of knowing over others....

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Seminars in Estonia: “social science 2.0: methods and ethics”

Seminars in Estonia: “social science 2.0: methods and ethics”

This week, I’m skipping the Aarhus University holiday week to teach a PhD course in Estonia.  One might ask, “What were you thinking!?” ….In fact, I asked myself this question about a dozen times last week as I was getting ready.  I’m looking forward to it, however, despite the somewhat rigorous schedule.  And for the first time, I have organized a course specifically around my own ideas about methods, ethics, and internet-related research.  If you’re in the area and want to attend, let me know and I’ll give you locations! October 14, 2013:  We set the stage by talking about how ideally, good ethics emerge from good methods and vice versa.  This morning, we’ll talk about the ethical and methodological...

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What would Malinowski do? Rethinking fieldwork in social media.

[this is a work in progress for publication later this year in Qualitative Communication Research, so it will change frequently.  Comments and suggestions welcome! Also note, i have not included the works cited list yet, but eventually it will be there.] In qualitative studies fieldwork is often used as a method of engaging with the phenomenon to gather information/data or to analyze practices in situ.  While fieldwork is the foundation of robust anthropological inquiry in physical settings, its practical methods do not fit comfortably in digital contexts.  For many researchers the activities of fieldwork must be so radically adjusted, they hardly resemble fieldwork anymore.  How does one conduct ‘participant observation’ of Twitter?  What counts as...

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Seminar Series in Umea 2013-2014

Description: This seminar series began in September 2013 and continues to May 2014.  Held once a month, most of the seminars are on Friday afternoon in the MITHuset (see schedule below).  Afterwards, we often go out for “after work” somewhere in the city center. This seminar series challenges participants to think differently about how one might do qualitative social inquiry in the 21st Century.  Embracing the epistemological challenges of feminists, postmodernists, post structuralists, interpretive sociologists, feminist technoscientists, and other “post” style schools of thought, we discuss innovative and creative ways of knowing.  The series is based on the premise that current normative definitions and parameters for research methods tend...

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Reading List for “Pathways to Meaning” August 2013

Lori Kendall and I are teaching a PhD course in a few weeks called “Pathways to Meaning.”  It’s an exercise-based course, where participants get to learn more about and practice some specific analytical tools, as well as play with different empirical approaches.   Here’s our reading list for 2013.   GENERAL RESEARCH LOGICS Mol, A., & Law, J. (2002 ). Complexities: An introduction. In Law, J. & Mol, A. (Eds). Complexities: Social studies of knowledge practices (1-22).  Duke University Press. Goodall, H. L. (2003). What is Interpretive Ethnography? An Eclectic’s Tale.  In Clair, R. P. (Ed.). Expressions of Ethnography (pp. 55-64).  Albany, NY: Suny Press. Markham, A. (2013). Remix Cultures, Remix Methods: Reframing...

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